of deadlines, commitments, and targets

Why do we need targets? A loose metaphor would be to say that we need them for the same reasons ships needed lighthouses in older times. To reach the intended destination, avoid any disasters and so on.

So, why am I here writing about this self-help kind of stuff? Well, I am not really preaching anything here. Ten days back, I have decided to write an article a day here for ten continuous days. And I have met my target and here is the tenth article about my experience. Veteran bloggers can stop chuckling now. Is writing an article a day really that challenging? I think it is, for someone like me or for many who want to update their blogs regularly and don’t do that for various reasons.

I always felt I wasn’t writing here as frequently as I wish to. I decided to experiment with ten continuous articles and somehow I managed to write them, even though I wasn’t confident initially.

Targets keep us motivated. We feel guilty when we do not meet them and in fact no one wants to be guilty. That makes us work hard and meet the targets or in the least give them the best shot we can give. A deadline adds a little pressure to the target and that in turn helps us to be more committed.

Let us say, Someone wants to become a writer. That is his target and he is well aware of it. But, without a deadline attached, it is no more than a lazy daydream. Daydreams are good while they last.

Let us say, that Someone attaches a target to the dream and decides that he wants to start writing five hundred words a day. Now, there is a target and a deadline. All that Someone needs is a little commitment to achieve his target daily. After a few days he might set the target to thousand words per day.

Targets with a deadline attached and with the necessary commitment is a simple recipe for success.

Yes, I hear you saying: not always. There are times, no matter how committed we are, we cannot meet the targets that we set. Either we set exceptionally high targets or we simply failed for reasons whatever. Nothing is a failure for that matter. The fact that we tried shows we are successful at trying.

In the last nine articles, I hope I have written something that is worth reading. Anyhow, for me, the process of writing is more exciting than the final result. Edits, re-edits, loss of words, over doing few sentences, and finally that grammar stuff I always hate. I have something in mind but when I start typing the words, they turn out to be not exactly what I want to say. So I try to re-write and then re-write.

If you have a blog and feel that you are not updating it as frequently as you wish you should, keep a simple target like this. Write an article a day for ten days. The point is, writing the articles that are worth reading.

I hope to write more regularly here. Hmm… a daydream without a target! :)

Thank you for reading!

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3 Comments

  1. Anuradha
    Posted July 30, 2009 at 5:28 pm | Permalink

    I have been reading your articles from 10 days.
    They are interesting .
    Keep writing… want to listen more from you.
    All the Best !

  2. Suvrat
    Posted August 1, 2009 at 7:22 pm | Permalink

    “Why do we need targets?”

    Too abrupt an ending. Never start with a question if it can be avoided.

    “A loose metaphor would be to say that we need them for the same reasons ships needed lighthouses in older times.”

    Bad metaphor. Ships still need lighthouses. Get rid of the ‘in older times’.

    “Ten days back, I have decided to write an article a day here for ten continuous days. And I have met my target and here is the tenth article about my experience. Veteran bloggers can stop chuckling now.”

    Tenses. Cliches need to be avoided.

    “That is his target and he is well aware of it. But, without a deadline attached, it is no more than a lazy daydream. Daydreams are good while they last.”

    Uninteresting. No one ever wants to read of a mathematical proof. Give an insight into your head, and not hypothetical drivel.

    “Either we set exceptionally high targets or we simply failed for reasons whatever. Nothing is a failure for that matter. The fact that we tried shows we are successful at trying.”

    Language and grammar. Edit please.

    “Edits, re-edits, loss of words, over doing few sentences, and finally that grammar stuff I always hate. I have something in mind but when I start typing the words, they turn out to be not exactly what I want to say. So I try to re-write and then re-write.”

    Woah! Ok, let’s stop critiquing the article for a moment and give you a little advice, writer to writer. Never get bored by editing. Be your own worst critic, re-read, re-edit and make it a habit. Weild that knife savagely. Cut something down from ten words to five. Then go ahead and cut out the entire sentence and write a better one. Any bloody fool can write, what must set you apart is the way you tell it. Save yourself each draft. Once you see the results at the end, you’ll begin to like it.

    By the way, the problem that what you write is never what you want it to be is a standard problem. Tell me if you get a solution yeah?

    Good luck.

    First impressions after reading the article, you have no distinctive voice yet. Work on that. I write stories and/or poems, not articles. I see the next post is a story. I’ll go through it and give you better feedback when I get the chance.

    • Chandra
      Posted August 1, 2009 at 8:14 pm | Permalink

      Thank you very much for the insight and advice. Would love to hear from you on the other articles when you get the chance.

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